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SCHENECTADY DIGITAL HISTORY ARCHIVE

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A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times
7: Adult Freeholders — Jonathan Stevens

Prof. Jonathan Pearson

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[This information is from pp. 146-147 of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being contributions toward a history of the lower Mohawk Valley by Jonathan Pearson, A. M. and others, edited by J. W. MacMurray, A. M., U. S. A. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell's Sons, Printers, 1883). It is in the Schenectady Collection of the Schenectady County Public Library at Schdy R 974.744 P36, and copies are also available for borrowing.]

[Copies of this book are available from the Schenectady County Historical Society.]

[The original version uses assorted typographical symbols to represent footnotes. To improve legibility, the online version uses the form (page number - note number.)]

Jonathan Stevens, a young man from New England, probably came to Schenectady about 1690, with Thomas Smith.

In 1693, he married a Mohawk woman named Lea, widow of Claas Willemse Van Coppernol. (146-5)

In 1698, he hired Mrs. De Graaf's farm at the Hoek, and the Fourth Flat of Tam Smith for five years. (147-1)

His home lot in the village was on the north side of State Street, having a front of 75 ft. 6 in., Amst. measure (now reduced to 65 ft. Eng.), and extending in the rear beyond Liberty street, and behind the lots lying on either side of it, comprising more than an acre of ground.

Numbers 107 and 109, owned by Mr. G. I. Swortfiguer, and 111 and 113 belonging to the estate of the late William Cunningham, were parts of Stevens' lot.

His farm was in Glenville, bounded east by the Aal plaats kil, and south by the Mohawk river, and comprised several hundred acres of flat and woodland.

His son Arent, had great influence with the Mohawks, and for more than 20 years acted as interpreter and agent for Sir William Johnson in his negotiations with the different tribes. He owned lands, and for some time resided at Canajoharie. (147-2)

Notes

(146-5) Dutch Church records; Deeds, IV.

(147-1) Toll Papers.

(147-2) Col. Doc., VI, 292, 512, 783, 787, 796, 975; VII, 70.

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