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Alco-General Electric Diesel-Electric Switcher - Manual for Enginemen TP 107A

660-HP Switcher, 1000-HP Switcher, 1000-HP Road Switcher

[Note: Images of each page (averaging 60-80K) are provided at their original size in the contents area. Illustrations are included in original and enlarged sizes within the text.]

[Cover] | [Title Page]

[Page 3] THE YELLOW EYE

Sturdy Alco-GE diesel-electric locomotives are precision built, and will do any job within their capacity quickly and dependably. Like any precision tool, however, they work only as expertly as the hand at the controls, and retain their keen edge longer when not abused. Therefore, the performance of a diesel-electric depends to a large measure upon intelligent handling and good care.

By applying the rules, tips, and information given in this manual, you can enhance the performance and prolong the life of your diesel-electric locomotive. Moreover, you will experience the satisfaction and recognition associated with a job well done.

[Page 4] Photos of 660-HP Switcher [1x | 4x], 1000-HP Switcher [1x | 4x], 1000-HP Road Switcher [1x | 4x]

[Page 5]

CONTENTS

Subject Pages Page Images
Clearance Diagrams - Haulage Capacity 6-8 6, 7, 8
How a Diesel-Electric Functions 9 9
Controls at Engineman's Position 10-11 10, 11
Other Operating Controls 12-15 12, 13, 14, 15
How to Operate Your Diesel Electric 16-17 16, 17
Throttle Operation and Controller Positions 18-19 18, 19
Operating Tips 20-21 20, 21
Operating Gages and Automatic Safeguards 22-23 22, 23
Location of Fuses 24-25 24, 25
Diesel Engine 26-27 26, 27
Fuel-oil System 28-29 28, 29
Lubricating-oil System 30-31 30, 31
Cooling-water System 32-33 32, 33
Pressure-air System 34-35 34, 35
Controls and Operation of Multiple-unit Locomotives 36-39 36, 37, 38, 39
Unusual Operating Conditions 40-47 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47

1000-HP SWITCHER [Diagrams 1x | 4x]

115 Tons on Drivers
60 MPH Maximum Speed
One GT-553 Generator; Four GE-731 Motors; 75:16 Gear Ratio; 40-in. Wheels

TRAILING TONS* IT WILL HAUL SAFELY

Speed   Tractive    Time         GRADE - COMPENSATED FOR CURVATURE
 MPH     Effort     Limit  Level   0.5%   1.0%   1.5%   2.0%  2.5%  3.0%

  5.0    50,000     4 min.  ....   3325   1925   1335   1010   805   660
  7.5    36,500    90 min.  ....   2385   1370    940    705   555   450
 10.0    28,000    90 min.  5765   1790   1020    695    514   400   320
 15.0    19,800     Cont.   3805   1210    680    455    328   248   190
 20.0    15,000     Cont.   2640    864    480    310    218   158   115
 25.0    12,000     Cont.   1905    644    350    220    149   100    69
 30.0    10,000     Cont.   1435    495    266    160    100    63   ...
 35.0     8,100     Cont.   1030    360    185    104     58   ...   ...
 40.0     6,600     Cont.    730    255    120     59   ....   ...   ...

* Based on Davis train resistance formulae for standard 4-axle cars with an average weight per car of 40 tons.

660-HP SWITCHER [Diagrams 1x | 4x]

99 Tons on Drivers
60 MPH Maximum Speed
One GT-552 Generator; Four GE-731 Motors; 75:16 Gear Ratio; 40-in. Wheels

TRAILING TONS* IT WILL HAUL SAFELY

Speed   Tractive    Time         GRADE - COMPENSATED FOR CURVATURE
 MPH     Effort     Limit  Level   0.5%   1.0%   1.5%   2.0%  2.5%  3.0%

  5.0    34,000    90 min.  ....   2240   1290    888    667   526   429
  7.5    24,700     Cont.   5200   1590    908    617    457   355   285
 10.0    18,900    90 min.  3870   1188    669    448    326   248   194
 15.0    12,900     Cont.   2460    765    420    272    189   136   100
 20.0     9,800     Cont.   1700    540    289    179    118    78    51
 25.0     7,800     Cont.   1210    392    203    119     71    40   ...
 30.0     6,350     Cont.    882    287    141     75    ...   ...   ...
 35.0     5,100     Cont.    601    197     87    ...    ...   ...   ...
 40.0     4,100     Cont.    415    125     44    ...    ...   ...   ...

* Based on Davis train resistance formulae for standard 4-axle cars with an average weight per car of 40 tons.

1000-HP ROAD SWITCHER [Diagrams 1x | 4x]

120 Tons on Drivers
60 MPH Maximum Speed
One GT-553 Generator; Four GE-731 Motors; 75:16 Gear Ratio; 40-in. Wheels

TRAILING TONS* IT WILL HAUL SAFELY

Speed   Tractive    Time         GRADE - COMPENSATED FOR CURVATURE
 MPH     Effort     Limit  Level   0.5%   1.0%   1.5%   2.0%  2.5%  3.0%

  5.0    50,000     4 min.  ....   3325   1925   1335   1010   805   660
  7.5    36,500    90 min.  ....   2385   1370    940    705   555   450
 10.0    28,000    90 min.  5765   1790   1020    695    514   400   320
 15.0    19,800     Cont.   3805   1210    680    455    328   248   190
 20.0    15,000     Cont.   2640    864    480    310    218   158   115
 25.0    12,000     Cont.   1905    644    350    220    149   100    69
 30.0    10,000     Cont.   1435    495    266    160    100    63    37
 35.0     8,100     Cont.   1030    360    185    104     58   ...   ...
 40.0     6,600     Cont.    730    255    120     59   ....   ...   ...
 45.0     5,300     Cont.    505    167     68    ...   ....   ...   ...
 50.0     4,300     Cont.    334    100   ....    ...   ....   ...   ...
 60.0     2,900     Cont.    119   ....   ....    ...   ....   ...   ...

* Based on Davis train resistance formulae for standard 4-axle cars with an average weight per car of 40 tons.

HOW A DIESEL-ELECTRIC FUNCTIONS

[Diagram 1x | 4x]

A diesel-electric locomotive is quite simple - the engine drives the generator which produces electricity to run the motors geared to the axles. When the throttle is opened, the generator is connected to the traction motors. Power then flows to the traction motors, and the locomotive moves. As the throttle is opened wider, the engine speeds up, delivering more power to the generator and thus to the traction motors. When the throttle is wide open, the engine runs at 740 rpm. The generator automatically adjusts its electric output to the motors so as to apply the required horsepower up to maximum rating for any combination of speed and load.

CONTROLS AT ENGINEMAN'S POSITION

[Photo 1x | 4x]

Labels: Throttle, Battery-charging Ammeter, Fuel-oil Pressure Gage, Straight Air Brakes, Control-air Pressure Gage, Engine-Water Temperature Indicator, Automatic Air Brakes, Lubricating-oil Pressure Gage, Controller Handle, Overload Indicating Light

Numbered labels:

  1. Main and Equalizing Reservoirs Air Gage - red is main-reservoir pressure, and white is equalizing-reservoir pressure.
  2. Engine-start Switch - cranks engine from the battery.
  3. Control Switch-energizes control circuits.
  4. Fuel-pump Switch - starts fuel-oil-pump motor.
  5. (6)(7)(8) Headlight switches for bright, first close Dim switch and then Bright switch.
  6. Brake-cylinder and Brake-pipe Air Gage-red is cylinder pressure, and white is pipe pressure.
  7. (11) Switches for Gage and Dome Lights.
  8. Switch for Engine-room Lights.
  9. (14) Number-lights and Marker-lights Switches.
  10. Heater Switch - starts cab-heater motor.
  11. Wheel-slip Buzzer - warns of wheels slipping.

[Photo 1x | 4x]

Labels:

Emergency Fuel-oil Cutoff - shuts off fuel at tank, stops engine.

Shutter Control - opens and closes shutters over radiator fan.

Window-wiper Valve - regulates speed of wipers.

Air-horn Cock - cuts out air horn.

Window-wiper Valve - cuts out wipers.

Battery-switch Handle - push in to connect battery to electric circuits so that engine may be started and electric devices will operate. When pulled out, with diesel engine stopped, all electric apparatus on the locomotive is dead.

ENGINE ROOM CONTROLS

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Overspeed Trip - automatically shuts down diesel engine if it overspeeds. Pull trip lever to stop engine in emergency.

Cutout Pin - pull out and turn downward to cut out faulty cylinder.

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Secondary Fuel-oil Filter - rotate handles to keep filters free from clogging. See page 21.

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Lubricating-oil Filters - rotate handles to keep filters free from clogging. See page 21.

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Water-level Gage - should always show water.

OTHER CONTROLS

ENGINEMAN'S POSITION

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Sander Valve and Bell Valve

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Cab Heater - to operate, open valves and close heater switch.

CONTROL COMPARTMENT

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Ground Relay and Switch - when switch is open, permits emergency operation with a ground in the electric power circuits.

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Primary Fuel-oil Filter - throw handle to free filter when clogged. See page 29.

ABOVE PLATFORM

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Fuel-oil Level Gage

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Side-shutter Handle - operates shutters over radiator on each side.

BELOW PLATFORM

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Emergency Fuel Cutoff - shuts off fuel at tank, stops engine.

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Water Filler Pipe

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Reservoir Drain Valve - lets off condensate from main air reservoir.

ENGINE ROOM

[Photo 1x | 9x]

Water Drain Valves - used to drain engine cooling system.

HOW TO OPERATE YOUR DIESEL-ELECTRIC

When taking over a diesel-electric, check the lubricating oil, fuel oil, and cooling water - see that hand valves in the water, air, and oil lines are in the proper position. Give handles on the filters in the fuel and lubricating-oil lines one turn. An inspection of engine, generator, and control compartments for cloths, tools, etc., that may have been inadvertently left near moving parts or electric connections is a worthwhile precaution.

STARTING THE ENGINE

  1. Close throttle.
  2. Turn controller handle to Neutral position.
  3. Close battery switch.
  4. Close Fuel-pump switch and wait until fuel oil pressure builds up to 30 to 45 lb.
  5. Close Control switch.
  6. Close and hold Engine-start switch. After lubricating-oil pressure builds up to 30 lb. and engine fires, release the start switch.
  7. Let engine idle until cooling-water temperature reaches 120F. and air pressure builds up to operating value.

NOTE: After engine is warm, air pressure can be built up faster by opening throttle somewhat less than halfway. Running the unloaded engine with throttle open wider is bad practice. Close throttle when air is up.

MOVING THE LOCOMOTIVE

  1. Release hand brake.
  2. Apply air brakes to see that brakes take hold and release.
  3. Turn controller handle from Neutral (in direction locomotive will move) to one of the three operating positions. See page 18.
  4. Release air brakes.
  5. Open throttle. See page 18.

STOPPING THE LOCOMOTIVE

  1. Close throttle.
  2. Apply air brakes.

REVERSING THE LOCOMOTIVE

  1. Bring locomotive to full stop.
  2. Move controller for operation in opposite direction.
  3. Release air brakes.
  4. Open throttle. See page 18.

NOTE: Never reverse locomotive when it is in motion.

LEAVING THE LOCOMOTIVE TEMPORARILY

  1. Bring locomotive to a full stop.
  2. Move controller handle to the Neutral position.
  3. Set the hand brake.

SHUTTING DOWN THE LOCOMOTIVE

  1. Stop engine by opening the Fuel-pump switch.
  2. Set hand brake and release air brakes.
  3. Turn off all lights.
  4. Open Control switch.
  5. Open main battery switch.

NOTE: Never stop diesel engine immediately after hard pull - allow it to idle until water temperature drops to normal. In freezing weather, drain cooling system, or keep water heated - otherwise leave engine running.

METHODS OF EMERGENCY SHUT-DOWN

  1. Pull Fuel-pump switch. If diesel engine does not stop:
  2. Pull hard on red ball on trip cable to close fuel-oil shutoff valve at fuel tank. If engine does not stop:
  3. Pull overspeed trip lever at engine. To reset, see page 23

THROTTLE OPERATION AND CONTROLLER POSITIONS

OPENING THE THROTTLE

When the throttle is first opened, the control circuits are energized, the generator is connected to the traction motors, and the locomotive starts to move.

Successive advancement of the throttle acts on the governor to admit more fuel to the engine. The engine speed will increase until it reaches the setting of the governor as controlled by the throttle. More power is delivered to the generator and thus to the traction motors.

When moving cars, open the throttle just out of the idling position and wait for the slack to be taken up; then open the throttle steadily as rapidly as desired up to the slipping point of the wheels. Throttle movements should be smooth and continous; do not jerk the throttle on and off. When the locomotive has accelerated to the desired speed, ease back on the throttle to the point where the speed is maintained. If locomotive at full throttle does not readily accelerate train to more than 6 1/2 mph, reduce train weight.

With engine running and controller handle in an operating position, never leave the throttle open if the locomotive is not moving as this can seriously damage the traction motors.

SELECTING CONTROLLER POSITIONS

As locomotive speeds increase, traction-motor current decreases and voltage increases over a relatively wide range. To make maximum use of the voltage and current relationship between the generator and the traction motors, three different electric connections are used -- Series, Series-parallel and Reduced field. Consequently, the controller has these three positions for both Forward and Reverse. The positions selected depend on operating conditions.

SERIES POSITION - for low speeds and heavy drags.

Operation in the Series position at speeds above 8 or 10 mph reduces traction-motor output and results in a relatively low top-train speed. Control is such that the locomotive automatically operates in Series up to 8 mph, when accelerating, even though the controller may be set for Series-parallel or Reduced field.

This position is desirable in ascending grades that have dips which would permit locomotive speeds high enough for an automatic transfer to Series-parallel with a subsequent manual transfer back to Series at the end of the dip resulting in a loss of momentum.

SERIES-PARALLEL POSITION - for intermediate speeds.

This connection gives maximum operating efficiency for speeds between 8 and 23 mph. With the controller in this position, the locomotive operates in Series up to 8 mph, then automatically transfers to the Series-parallel connection. Transfer back to Series must be made manually either by closing the throttle and reopening, or by reducing to 1/4 throttle opening and turning controller handle to Series position.

REDUCED FIELD POSITION - for high speeds.

This position permits the traction motors to apply the full diesel-engine output at maximum train speed. This position is most desirable for normal operation. The motors operate in Series up to 8 mph, then they are automatically connected in Series-parallel. At 23 mph, they are automatically reconnected for Reduced field. The transfer back to Series-parallel is also automatic. The transfer from Series-parallel to Series is manual.

OPERATING TIPS

AUTOMATIC TRANSITION

The controller handle should be moved to reduced field position to utilize the automatic transition feature.

With the controller in this position the traction motors operate in Series up to 8 MPH, then they are automatically connected in Series-parallel. At 23 MPH they are automatically reconnected for reduced field. The transfer back to Series-parallel is also automatic at 16 MPH (at full throttle) but the transfer from Series-parallel to Series must be made manually when the CL indicating lamp lights, which is approximately 6.5 MPH on the 660 HP locomotive and 7.7 MPH on the 1000 HP locomotive, either by closing the throttle and reopening or by reducing the throttle to 1/4 opening and turning the controller handle to Series position.

If the locomotive is equipped with a loadmeter, see that currents above 730 amps are for Series operation only.

USING AIR BRAKES

Do not use independent air brakes to stop a heavy train - use the automatic brake. When testing air brakes with train in motion, partially close throttle to decrease current in traction motors, before applying brakes. After speed has dropped sufficiently, release brakes and reopen the throttle to desired position.

APPLYING SAND

Sand bad rail before wheels slip or before brakes are applied.

When wheels slip with power on, partially close the throttle until slipping stops, sand the rails and then open throttle.

OPERATING THROUGH WATER

Do not exceed 2 or 3 mph if there is water over the rail. Never operate the locomotive through water that is more than 4 inches above the rail head.

PASSING OVER RAILROAD CROSSINGS

Partially close the throttle just prior to crossing so that less current flows through the traction motors. This reduces the likelihood of arcing under the brushes and flashovers at the motor commutator when the wheels jar over the crossing.

INSPECTIONS DURING OPERATIONS

Every 8 hours, perform the items listed below. When locomotives are in road service, this should be done more often, preferably at every terminal stop.

  1. Cuno Strainer Handles - rotate handles on lubricating-oil filter on right front of engine and on fuel-oil filter near fuel injection pumps.
  2. Water-level Glass - see that the water level glass at the expansion tank at the back of the radiator compartment shows water at all times.
  3. Traction-motor Blowers - check blowers and belt drives to be sure they are operating.
  4. Lubricating-oil Level - check oil level on bayonet gage; level should be within 1 1/4 inch of high mark with engine running and locomotive standing on level track.

Make periodic visual inspections of underneath equipment to see that there are no loose or dragging parts. This is particularly important if the locomotive is in road service. Investigate any unusual sounds or odors immediately and report to the maintainer.

OPERATING GAGES AND AUTOMATIC SAFEGUARDS

GAGES

  1. Engine Cooling-water Temperature - Hold the temperature between 150 degrees and 170 degrees F. by controlling the radiator shutters. There are shutters over the radiator sections on either side of the hood and over the radiator fan in the roof of the locomotive. In controlling temperatures, start out with all shutters closed. Then first open the top shutters by operating the lever in the cab. If the temperature exceeds 170 degrees F. with the top shutters wide open, the side shutters should be opened beginning with the right, or engineer's side, in the Summer time, and beginning with the left, or fireman's side, in the Winter time. This arrangement gives better oil cooling since oil and water cores are mounted on the right side, while only water cores are mounted on the left side. If water temperature exceeds 180 degrees F., determine the cause. Never let the temperature exceed 190 degrees F.
  2. Lubricating-oil Pressure - should never be less than 26 lb.
  3. Fuel-oil Pressure - should be between 30 and 50 lb.
  4. Water Level - should always show water.
  5. Control-air Pressure - should be 70 lb.
  6. Air-brake Pressure - should read in accordance with railroad practice.
  7. Battery Ammeter - normally should read between 0 and plus 5. If it continually shows discharge, notify the maintainer.

ALARMS

  1. Generator Overload Indicating Lamp - when current exceeds the rated current value for the generator, an indicator lamp lights on the control stand when the motors are operating in Series-parallel or with Reduced field. When the lamp lights (disregard flickering), close the throttle, move controller handle to Series and reopen throttle.
  2. Wheel-slip Buzzer - if the wheels slip, a buzzer sounds in the cab. When this occurs, shut off or partially close throttle until the buzzing stops; this indicates that slipping is over. On locomotives equipped to stop wheel slipping automatically, ease off the throttle only when slipping is recurrent. With a heavy load on bad rail, the throttle may have to be closed and reopened several times to get the train moving.

SAFETY DEVICES

  1. Lubricating-oil-pressure Switch - when the lubricating-oil pressure drops to 23 lb. this switch opens the governor dump valve and stops the engine. This switch resets automatically when oil pressure is restored.
  2. Ground Relay - when ground occurs in high-voltage electric circuits, the ground relay operates to reduce the generator field. If locomotive suddenly loses power, inspect relay to see whether it has tripped. To reset ground relay, close the throttle and reset the relay by raising the holding latch. If the ground persists, open ground-relay switch, reset relay and move the locomotive no more than absolutely necessary to get in the clear.
  3. Engine-overspeed Trip - if the diesel engine overspeeds, the overspeed trip will automatically shut down the engine.

    To reset, pull out each Bosch pump cutout plunger and turn until the trip pin points straight down. Pull out on the reset handle until it latches, and then pull out and turn each plunger to engage trip pin in the notch in the rack.

LOCATION OF FUSES

[Photo 1x | 4x] Control Stand with Side Door Open

Labels: Engine-starting Circuit, Control Circuit, Fuel-pump Motor, Front Headlight, Rear Headlight, Gage Light, Dome Light, Engine-room Light, Number Lights, Marker Lights, Cab-heater Motor, Spare

EFFECT OF BLOWN FUSES

When Starting UpFuses Involved
Engine will not crank
Battery circuit
Engine-starting circuit
Control circuit
Fuel Pump will not run
Battery circuit
Fuel-pump motor
Battery ammeter shows discharge
Control circuit
Auxiliary-generator power circuit
Auxiliary-generator field
Locomotive will not move
Control circuit

Locomotive in OperationFuses Involved
Battery ammeter continuously shows discharge
Auxiliary-generator power circuit
Auxiliary-generator field
Battery ammeter reads zero
Battery circuit
Locomotive stops
Control circuit
Diesel engine loses load
Control circuit
Fuel pump stops
Fuel-pump motor
Diesel engine stops
Fuel-pump motor
Lights do not burn
Respective light

TESTING A FUSE

  1. Try putting a new fuse in place of the questionable one to see if the difficulty is corrected. Actual test of the fuse should be made with a test set by the maintainer.

[Photo 1x | 4x] Control Compartment Fuses

Labels: Auxiliary-generator Field, Control-compartment Light, Auxiliary-generator Power Circuit, Main Battery Circuit

DIESEL ENGINE

Model 539 - Turbocharged

[Photo 1x | 4x] 1 Exhaust Side

Labels: Water Header, Valve Gear, Cylinder Head, Fuel-drain Header, Secondary Fuel-oil Filter, Base End Cover, Low Lubricating-oil Pressure Switch, Lubricating-oil Pump, Governor, Overspeed Trip Lever, Exhaust Manifolds, Fuel-injection System, Breather, Water Pump, Fuel-pump and Governor Drive, Pump Cutout Plunger Handles, Fuel-pump and Governor Controls, Crankcase or Base

[Photo 1x | 4x] 2 Intake Side

Labels: Turbocharger, Generator, Air-inlet Manifold, Valve Gear, Frame or Cylinder Block, Low Lubricating-oil Pressure Switch, Lubricating-oil Filters, Gear Train and Casings

The Alco diesel engine has six cylinders, is of the single acting type, operating on a four-stroke cycle, and develops full rated horsepower at 740 rpm. The 660-HP engine is a nonturbocharged engine; the 1000-HP engine is a turbo-charged engine using the Buchi system. The engine is started by the main generator which operates off the storage battery as a starting motor when the Engine-start button is depressed.

OPERATION OF ENGINE SHUTDOWN MECHANISM

A dump valve on the Woodward governor power cylinder is held closed by an electric solenoid. If the circuit to the solenoid is opened - by pulling out fuel-pump button or automatic operation of low lube-oil-pressure switch - the dump valve opens and the pressure on the underside of the governor power piston is relieved. This forces the Bosch fuel-pump racks into shutdown position, and the engine stops.

STOPPING ENGINE AT THE ENGINE

Pull overspeed-trip lever at the engine.

FUEL-OIL SYSTEM

[Diagram 1x | 4x]

Labels: Fuel Pressure Gage, Primary Filter, Filler Pipe, Fuel Level Glass, Fuel Pump, 75lb. Relief Valve, Secondary Filter, Fuel Pump Racks, Fuel Header, 35lb. Relief Valve, Drain Valve, Cap, Fuel Tank, Sump, Emergency Fuel Cutoff Valve, Engine

FLOW OF FUEL

Fuel is drawn from main tank under cab floor through primary duplex filter to intake side of fuel pump in control compartment. Pump forces fuel through secondary filter to fuel header on bank of fuel-injection pumps. Excess fuel returns to main tank.

FILLING FUEL TANK

Run fuel oil into filler pipe at end platform and watch level gage on tank to avoid overflowing. Switchers hold 635 gallons, and road switchers 800 gallons. If no train-heat boiler is used the road-switcher boiler-water tank may be used increasing the capacity to 1600 gallons.

PRIMARY FILTER

Duplex filter in control compartment contains two units for filtering the fuel oil after it leaves the tank. Only one unit is used at a time. If the fuel-oil pressure drops below 30 lb. due to clogged filter, throw filter handle to transfer fuel flow through the clean unit. Report this action to maintainer.

SECONDARY FILTER

Filter on left side of engine cleans the fuel oil before it reaches the fuel-injection pumps. When the fuel pressure drops below 30 lb. rotate the handles to clear filter.

PRESSURE GAGE

This should read between 30 and 50 lb. when diesel engine is running. When fuel-oil pressure is lost or reads low, refer to page 42.

EMERGENCY FUEL CUTOFF

The cutoff valve near the fuel tank is for emergencies. It can be closed from three points on the locomotive, by pulling red knob at engineman's position or at either side of locomotive above center of rear truck. The valve must be reopened by hand.

LUBRICATING-OIL SYSTEM

[Diagram 1x | 4x]

Labels: Pressure Gage, Turbocharger, Bayonet Gage, Low pressure Oil Switch, Built in Oil Filter, 15lb. Radiator By-pass Valve, Oil Cooler Radiator Section, Waste Packed Filter, Engine, Lube Oil Header, Oil Reservoir, Drain Valve, Cap Oil Pump, 75lb. Relief Valve, 35lb. Regulating Valve, 35lb. Relief Valve

FLOW OF LUBRICATING OIL

Lubricating oil is drawn from oil reservoir in base of diesel engine by the lubricating oil pump at front of engine. Pump forces oil through the oil-cooler radiator sections and the waste-packed by-pass filter at front of locomotive.

CAPACITY OF SYSTEM

The system holds 80 gallons. The oil from the radiators flows through built-in filters to the oil header in the engine. Oil level can be checked by bayonet gage in the engine base and should be checked on level track with engine running.

BUILT-IN FILTERS

These filter the lubricating oil just ahead of engine header. When oil pressure drops below 30 lb., rotate handles to clear filters.

PRESSURE GAGE

This should never read less than 26 lb. when diesel engine is running.

LOW OIL-PRESSURE SWITCH

When oil pressure drops to 23 lb. this switch stops the diesel engine by opening the governor dump valve. This permits power piston in governor to pull down and shut off fuel supply to engine. The switch resets automatically when oil pressure is restored.

COOLING-WATER SYSTEM

[Diagram 1x | 4x]

Labels: Water Temperature Gage, Water Header, Water Level Glass, Filler Pipe, Water Expansion Tank, Overflow Pipe, Radiator Sections, Cab Heater, Turbocharger Drain Valve, Water Pump, Engine, Drain Valve, Filler Pipe and Steam Hose Connection, Engine Drain Valve

FLOW OF COOLING WATER

Pump circulates cooling water through engine and cooling system. It is an open system with an expansion tank vented to atmosphere through an overflow pipe.

FILLING SYSTEM

Use water treatment in cooling system. Run water into filler pipe with steam-hose connection, under left center of locomotive, until water appears in overflow pipes or add water through filling hole on top of roof. Capacity: 600-HP, 220 gallons - 1000-HP, 240 gallons.

DRAINING SYSTEM

Open engine-block drain valve, main valve in drain and filler pipe, and turbocharger drain valve on 1000-HP switchers. Keep engine-block drain valve closed when engine is running. On locomotives with water heater, open all drain valves in heater pipes.

WATER-TEMPERATURE GAGE

This should read between 150 degrees and 170 degrees F. See page 22.

WATER LEVEL GLASS

Sight glass on expansion tank at back of radiator compartment should always show water. Poor water circulation is indicated if water column shows spasmodic changes at a given engine speed.

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST FREEZING

If locomotive is shut down in freezing weather, connect steam line to water connection under left center of locomotive. Open drain valve and open steam valve slightly to admit a small flow of steam. When steam line is removed, add water to fill system. If steam is not available, drain the system.

CAB HEATER

To operate heater, open water valves to heater and close heater switch.

PRESSURE-AIR SYSTEM

[Schematic Air-Piping Diagram 1x | 4x]

Labels: Intake Filter, Safety Valve, Cooling Pipes, Strainer and Check, Control Air Gage, Reverser, Main Reservoir, Air Compressor, Compressor Governor, Dirt Collector, Reducing Valve, Control Air Reservoir, S/SP1/SP2 Contactors, Distributing Valve, Feed Valve, Sander Valve, Bell Ringer Valve, Strainer, Air Gages, Engineer's Brake Valve, Window Wiper Valves, Equalizing Reservoir, Bell, Horn, Window Wipers, Brake Pipe, Sand Taps, Brake Cylinders, Drain Cock, Cut-out Cock, Three-way Cock with Choke, Cut-out Cock with Side Vent

The Schedule 14-EL brake equipment on these locomotives is similar to the Schedule 6-ET equipment used on steam locomotives. A control reservoir is added which supplies air to the electro-pneumatic reverser and motor contactors S, SPl, and SP2. The air compressor is driven by an extension of the main-generator shaft.

SANDING

The sander valve controls the air which carries the sand from the sand traps to the rail.

DEAD HEADING

Refer to page 46.

AIR-BRAKE GAGES

Upper gage - the red hand shows main-reservoir pressure, while the white hand shows equalizing reservoir pressure.

Lower gage - the red hand shows brake-cylinder pressure, and the white hand shows brake-pipe pressure.

The pressures on the gages should conform to railroad standards.

CONTROL-AIR GAGE

This shows the air pressure available for operating the reverser and the motor contactors. When pressure is too low, these air devices cannot operate, and the locomotive will not move under its own power. The gage should show 70 lb. when air system is charged.

CONTROLS AND OPERATION OF MULTIPLE-UNIT LOCOMOTIVES

[Photo 1x | 4x]

Labels: Reverse Handle, Throttle, Battery-charging Ammeter, Fuel-oil Pressure Gage, Straight Air Brakes, Control-air Pressure Gage, Automatic Air Brakes, Lubricating-oil Pressure Gage, Engine-water Temperature Indicator, Overload Indicating Light, Double-heading Cock

Numbered labels:

  1. Main and Equalizing Reservoirs Air Gage - red is main-reservoir pressure, and white is equalizing-reservoir pressure.
  2. Engine-start Switch - cranks engine from battery.
  3. Control Switch - energizes control circuits.
  4. Fuel-pump Switch - starts fuel-oil-pump motor.
  5. (6)(7)(8) Headlight Switches - for bright, first close Dim switch and then Bright switch.
  6. Brake-cylinder and Brake-pipe Air Gage - red is cylinder pressure, and white is pipe pressure.
  7. (11) Far-headlight Switches - light far headlight on trailing unit.
  8. Dome-light Switch.
  9. Series-holding Switch - holds locomotive in Series connections when in S position.
  10. Gage and Number Lights Switch.
  11. Marker-lights Switch.
  12. Motor-control Switch - when open, prevents locomotive from moving when throttle is opened for faster air pumping.
  13. Wheel-slip Buzzer - warns of wheel slipping.

Multiple-unit locomotives have slightly different controls, consequently, their operation also differs in a few respects. Operating instructions previously covered in this manual apply except as indicated in this section.

SINGLE-UNIT OPERATION

STARTING THE ENGINE

Follow procedure on page 16 except for air pumping. To pump air faster, pull out Motor-control switch, move reverse handle to Forward or Reverse position, and then advance throttle not more than four notches. Some air pressure is required before throttle will operate engine above idling speed.

MOVING THE LOCOMOTIVE

Push in Motor-control switch and follow procedure on page 16 except in step 3 the controller handle has only one position for Forward and Reverse. For normal operation, put Series-holding switch in SP position. Transfer from Series to Series-parallel to Reduced Field as locomotive speed increases and from Reduced Field back to Series-parallel is automatic. Transfer from Series-parallel to Series is made manually by closing throttle, moving Series-holding switch to S position, and reopening throttle. To stay in Series connection, leave Series-holding switch in S position.

OPERATING THE THROTTLE

Advance the notch-type throttle by moving it positively from notch to notch - do not leave it halfway between notches. There are eight power notches in addition to idling notch. When pulling a heavy train, leave throttle a few seconds in each notch when advancing throttle.

OPERATING THE SANDERS

Depress foot switch on floor. Reverse handle automatically controls sanders for forward or backward movement.

MULTIPLE-UNIT OPERATION

Operation with two locomotives in multiple is essentially the same as single-unit operation except that both locomotives are controlled from one engineman's position.

CONNECTING UNITS TOGETHER

Couple two units together and connect air-lines and train-line jumpers. Be sure that each plug is pushed all the way into socket until socket cover latches on plug. To open air-line cocks on trailing unit, move brake-pipe cutout cock to No. 2 position. Move automatic-brake valve to Lap position, move independent brake valve to Running position, and remove both handles. Close throttle. Move reverse handle to Neutral position and remove handle.

STARTING THE ENGINES

Start engines in the same manner as for single-unit operation. Engine in leading unit must be started first. Control switch and Fuel-pump switches must be open on trailing locomotive. Faster air pumping is obtained on both units by advancing throttle on leading unit with Motor-control switch open.

MOVING THE LOCOMOTIVES

Be sure Series-holding switch on trailing unit is in SP position, otherwise this unit will stay in series when switch on leading unit is thrown for normal operation.

SHUTTING DOWN THE LOCOMOTIVES

Opening Fuel-pump switch on leading unit stops both engines. Otherwise steps on page 17 apply.

OPERATING GAGES

While operating, watch trailing unit to see that water temperature doesn't exceed 180 degrees F. Experience will indicate how to set shutters.

OPERATING HEADLIGHTS

Open all headlight switches on trailing units. Push Far-headlight-dim and Far-headlight-bright switches on leading unit to light far headlight on trailing unit.

SHUTTING DOWN ONE ENGINE

Disconnect train-line jumper between units to stop engine on trailing unit. Close all doors, windows, and ventilators. In freezing weather, drain cooling system.

ASCENDING GRADES

If train slows down enough on a grade to light the overload indicator, or, if the locomotive is equipped with a loadmeter and the loadmeter pointer indicates more than 730 amperes, close throttle and then reopen it. On a grade with dips in it, close throttle, put Series-holding switch in S position and reopen throttle. Perform either operation smoothly and quickly to prevent stalling train. When approaching grades that you know will require the above transfer, make transfer before train gets on the grade. Throw switch to SP position when over the grade and train speed increases.

OPERATING UNDER UNUSUAL CONDITIONS

ENGINE WON'T TURN OVER WHEN STARTING BUTTON IS PRESSED

  1. See that controller handle is in Neutral position.
  2. See that battery switch and Control switch are closed.
  3. See that engine-start and control fuses in control stand are good; also 110-amp fuse in control cabinet. If engine still doesn't turn over, the electric circuits may need checking. Call maintainer.

ENGINE TURNS OVER, BUT WON'T FIRE

  1. See that Fuel-pump push button is closed, and fuel-pump fuse is good.
  2. If fuel pump runs, but pressure doesn't build up to 30 lb., inspect fuel supply, filters, and piping for leaks or stoppage. See that emergency fuel-cutoff valve is open.
  3. If the piston rod on the governor power piston doesn't move upward when the engine is turning over, check wiring to the governor solenoid.
  4. Make sure overspeed-trip rack and cutout buttons on diesel engine are in reset position.
  5. See that injection pumps are not air bound. Loosen bleeder plugs on Bosch pumps until fuel flows out, then tighten plugs.
  6. If engine is very cold it may not be turning over fast enough to start. Preferably heat the cooling water with low-pressure steam. See page 33. Otherwise loosen half the indicator plugs in the cylinder heads - cylinders 1, 4, 5, or cylinders 2, 3, 6.

LOCOMOTIVE WILL NOT MOVE WITH ENGINE RUNNING AND THROTTLE OPEN

  1. Close throttle and open slowly-see that brakes are off and that wheels aren't slipping.
  2. See that control-air pressure is 70 lb. If not, and main-reservoir pressure is up, reducing valve may be stuck. Try tapping it.
  3. See that ground relay is not tripped. If tripped, see page 23.
  4. See that control fuse is good, also 10-, 80- and 110-amp fuses in control compartment.
  5. On multiple-unit locomotives, see that Motor-control switch is closed and its fuse good.

If above procedure does not correct condition, call maintainer.

LOCOMOTIVE STAYS AT LOW SPEEDS

This generally indicates that control is not transferring from Series to Series-parallel and or engine output is down. Operate in Series position until condition can be corrected.

LOCOMOTIVE MOVES UNDER POWER WITH THROTTLE CLOSED

The throttle switch is probably stuck. To stop locomotive, pull out fuel pump switch and apply brakes.

DIESEL ENGINE STOPS

  1. Check fuel-oil supply and pressure. If pressure is not up, see page 42.
  2. Bar engine over manually to see if it is free.
  3. Check lubricating-oil supply. Press Engine-start button to see whether pressure builds up properly. If it does not, see page 43.
  4. Check position of overspeed trip. If tripped, reset and start engine.
  5. If no cause of shutdown can be determined, it is probably the result of faulty governor action. Call maintainer.

FUEL PUMP DOESN'T RUN.

  1. See that Fuel-pump switch fuse is good.
  2. See that 110-amp fuse in control compartment is good.
  3. Check fuel pump for binding of shaft.
  4. If pump still doesn't run, call maintainer.

LOCOMOTIVE HAS LITTLE POWER WHEN THROTTLE IS OPENED

  1. See that both exciter and generator-field contactors close when throttle is open. If not, call maintainer.
  2. See that 10, 80, and 110-amp fuses in control compartment are good, and that battery is charged.
  3. Inspect throttle mechanism - make sure that throttle shaft or adjusting lever is connected at governor. On multiple-unit locomotives, call maintainer.
  4. See that auxiliary-generator-exciter set drive belts are not slipping.
  5. See that fuel-oil pressure is correct.
  6. See that all cylinders are firing.

FUEL-OIL PRESSURE DROPS

  1. Check fuel-oil supply.
  2. See that fuel pump is running. If pump is stopped, see above.
  3. See that emergency fuel-cutoff valve is open.
  4. Push handle of duplex filter in control compartment to opposite side to make sure filter is not clogged. Report this to maintainer.
  5. Rotate handles of Bosch filters on side of engine to make sure they are not clogged.
  6. Check for leaks on suction side of fuel pump.

LUBRICATING-OIL PRESSURE DROPS

  1. Check oil level in engine.
  2. Check for clogged Cuno filters and clean by rotating handles.
  3. Check for leaks.
  4. Check valve in line to waste-packed oil filter may be stuck. Try tapping it.

AIR PRESSURE DOES NOT BUILD UP

  1. See that main-reservoir drain valves and brake-pipe angle cocks are closed.
  2. Compressor governor may be stuck. Try tapping it.
  3. Faulty compressor. Call maintainer.

LOSS OF AIR PRESSURE

  1. Compressor governor may be stuck- try tapping it.
  2. Control air should be 70 lb. - check control-air reducing valve, cutout cock, and strainer under locomotive frame.

POORLY MAINTAINED MAIN RESERVOIR PRESSURE

  1. Compressor valve leaking - causes low pressure.
  2. Compressor governor sticking - causes either high or low pressure.
  3. Broken unloader pipe - causes high pressure.
  4. Sticky unloader valves - causes low or high pressure.
  5. Internal failure of compressor - causes low pressure.
  6. Closed cutout cock in governor pipe - causes high pressure

HOT CYLINDER

If one cylinder is receiving too much fuel, its exhaust pipe elbow will be hotter than the others, may even become red hot. Cut out this cylinder and report to maintainer.

CYLINDER NOT FIRING

The exhaust elbow of a cylinder not firing will be cooler than the others. Cut out this cylinder and report to maintainer.

CUTTING OUT FAULTY CYLINDER

Disengage injection-pump cutout pin of that cylinder from the overspeed-trip rack by pulling out cutout pin and turning it. Turn the finger downward until the dog of the cutout pin falls in the slot cut in the injection pump casing. The pin then moves in engaging injection-pump crosshead and holds pump plunger mechanism off injection-pump drive camshaft.

It is permissible to operate at full throttle with one cylinder cut out.

BROKEN FUEL PIPE

If fuel pipe from Bosch pump to nozzle is broken, cut out that cylinder and notify the maintainer.

GROUND RELAY CLOSES

If possible, call the maintainer to inspect generator and traction motors to determine the cause of the ground. It will operate if there is any leakage from high-voltage wiring to locomotive frame. This may occur during a "flashover" which in turn sometimes results from bad wheel slipping, throttle slamming or other careless throttle handling.

If the locomotive is in vital transfer or road service, make sure there is no burning smell or serious damage, then reset the relay and proceed. If the relay trips again, open the ground-relay switch, reset the relay, and move the locomotive only far enough to get in the clear.

HOT TRACTION MOTOR SUSPENSION BEARING

This is evidenced by smoke or odor. In switching service, notify the maintainer. In road service, remove the waste, discard charred portions, and repack the bearing, being sure the waste is against the axle. Add plenty of oil, pouring some directly on the waste. After running several miles, inspect the bearing. If it continues to run hot, try backing off the bearing nuts a slight amount.

UNUSUAL NOISES

If the turbocharger or the engine-generator unit gives off an unusual noise, shut down the engine and notify the maintainer.

HIGH ENGINE TEMPERATURES

If the radiator fan will not keep the water temperature normal, check water level, fan shutters, fan belt, and water-pump drive.

An abnormally high reading of thermometer at engineman's position with shutters open indicates faulty circulation or low water. Poor circulation is indicated by spasmodic fluctuations of water column in sight glass on expansion tank at a given engine speed; also by localized heating at various points such as cylinder heads, radiators and water pump.

If water is low and engine has just been worked hard, idle until temperature becomes normal. If possible, add water to the system slowly while the engine is idling.

ENGINE OVERSPEEDS AFTER KICKING CARS

If diesel engine continually overspeeds after the throttle is closed, causing overspeed trip to operate, shut down the engine and notify maintainer. Check Bosch pump rack setting at shutdown position.

ENGINE DIES AFTER KICKING CARS

This usually indicates faulty governor; however, check lubricating-oil system before starting up again.

DEAD-HEAD LOCOMOTIVE

  1. Close throttle and move reverse handle to Neutral position.
  2. Open Control switch and main battery switch.
  3. Close double-heading cock and open dead-engine cock. Leave independent and automatic-brake handles in running positions.
  4. Close all doors, windows and ventilators.
  5. In freezing weather, drain cooling water from radiator, engine and turbocharger.

RUNNING WITH ONE BLOWER DOWN

Load locomotive to only half its full capacity if a traction-motor blower is inoperative. Otherwise, the two traction motors, which it normally ventilates will overheat.

MOVING LOCOMOTIVE WITH ONE TRUCK CUT OUT

Maintainer must first change connections to cut out the motors on defective truck.

Start the diesel engine. Set controller for Series-parallel in desired direction of movement and open throttle to move locomotive. Do not overload the motors on live truck. Move locomotive only far enough to rerail it, or get in the clear.

Maintainer will restore wiring to normal when the trouble has been corrected.

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Updated 7/9/01
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