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Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs:
Allen

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[This information is from Vol. III, pp. 1274-1275 of Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, edited by Cuyler Reynolds (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911). It is in the Reference collection of the Schenectady County Public Library at R 929.1 R45. Some of the formatting of the original, especially in lists of descendants, may have been altered slightly for ease of reading.]

The first person of whom any account has been handed down, who bore the name of Alen or Alawy, is the Bard of Britain, uncle of Caractacus, who had for ancestors a long line of British kings, and who must have been born at the very dawn of the Christian era. The next historic personage of the name is "Alana, Chieftain," who was slain on the field of Camlon, A.D., 542. The third of the name is "Alan, a saint," who was born in Amoricer (Brittainy, a fertile province of France). He left his native country and became a member of the College of Illyd in Glamorganshire. He had three sons who became members of the same college and distinguished ornaments of the Welsh church. Alan (1), "Sergeant," commanded a division or wing of the army of William at the battle of Hastings and contributed largely to the result of that battle which gave to William the title of "the Conqueror." Alan was fully rewarded by gifts of immense tracts of lands from the king, becoming, next to the king, the richest person in England. He had four brothers, all of whom received lands and titles and founded families. Miss [Charlotte Mary] Yonge, in her History of Christian Names, says that one of the Alans located in Scotland and there married an heiress, whose grandson Alan married Eva, daughter of Lord of Tippermur, and became high steward of Scotland and was both the progenitor of the race of Stewart and the original ancestor of the hosts of Alens and Allens who have ever since filled Scotland. From the earliest days of heraldy the Allens have borne arms. No less than sixty-two families have had this honor bestowed upon them in the last six centuries. The history of the Allen family of New Scotland, Albany county, begins in America at about the time of the revolution.

(I) David Allen, born in the lowlands of Scotland of well-to-do parents, married, against his parents' wishes, a girl from the highlands. The parental displeasure at his marriage was so plainly manifested that he left Scotland with his wife and came to the United States during the closing years of the revolution. They were accompanied by his brother William. After a time David Allen located on a farm in the town of New Scotland in the locality known as the "Clip." Here he erected a house of stone which is still standing in good condition. This was the home of David and his family until his death at a good old age. He cleared a large portion of the tract and brought it under cultivation. They were lifelong members of the Presbyterian church, and were people of culture and education. A letter written by David Allen shows that the relatives in Scotland were of the superior class. David and his wife are buried in the Presbyterian burying ground of New Scotland. They had seven sons.

(II) John, eldest son of David Allen, was born on the farm at the "'Clip" in 1780. According to the Scottish law which has been strictly observed in this family the farm descended to him by right of being the eldest son and on it he passed his entire life, dying at the age of eighty. He is buried by the side of his wife in the Presbyterian burying ground. He married Nancy McCulloch, born in 1785, who survived her husband five years and died aged eighty years. Children:

  1. David I., see forward.
  2. Jane, married William Murphy, a farmer of New Scotland, in which town they died, leaving among others William S. and Mary E., the latter widowed.
  3. William, married Mary Sager and removed to Scott county, Iowa, where they now reside being over eighty years of age; children: John, Alfred, Jane, La Grange, Mary A. and Louise.
  4. Andrew, married Catherine Sager; he was a farmer of New Scotland; children: John, deceased; Ira, Mary, David, deceased; Ethan, Agnes, Milly and Charles.
  5. John, died in youthful manhood.

(III) David I., eldest son of John and Nancy (McCulloch) Allen, was born on the homestead at the "Clip," January 6, 1806, died December 5, 1876. The home farm came to him by right of birth and there he spent his days. He married (first) in Coeymans, Elizabeth Armstrong, who died a little later; no issue. He married (second) in his native town, New Scotland, Fanny Moak, born 1812, died March 21, 1903, daughter of James and Mary (Taylor) Moak. The Moak family were early settlers of the town and people of prominence. Children:

  1. Elizabeth, married Joshua Wynkoop and had Joshua (2).
  2. John, inherited the paternal acres, and also learned the trade of carpentry, which he also followed to a considerable extent; he was very energetic and met his death by falling from a housetop when he was enfeebled by years, being then aged seventy-one; he married Agnes Patterson, and had a son David, employed in the United States custom house at New York, resides in Rutherford, New Jersey.
  3. Joseph, married Melissa Simmons, both deceased.
  4. Harriet, died at age of seventeen years.
  5. Bradford, see forward.
  6. Frances, died in childhood.
  7. Allison, now a resident of Clarksville, New York; married Emmeline Flansburg.
  8. Agnes, died young.
  9. Catherine J., married David H. Van Atten, of Clarksville, New York, and has son Joseph, who married Vina Andrews.

(IV) Bradford, fifth child of David I. and Fanny (Moak) Allen, was born on the "Clip" homestead in New Scotland, Albany county, New York, August 30, 1843. He remained at home with his parents until he reached the age of twenty-four, when he purchased a farm near Clarksville, New York, which he cultivated, living there until the tragic death of his son when he retired to the village of Clarksville where he has his home and a small place of eight acres. He is a man of high character and strict integrity, standing well in the estimation of his friends and neighbors. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, a Republican in politics and has held several of the town offices. He married, in New Scotland, February 4, 1864, Caroline Flansburg, born December 22, 1843, daughter of Michael and Maria (Simmons) Flansburg, and sister of Rufus and John Flansburg, retired business men of Voorheesville, New York. An only son, David J., born December 18, 1864, died from the kick of a horse, August 1, 1906, unmarried.

Michael Flansburg, father of Caroline (Flansburg) Allen, was born June 3, 1809, in New Scotland, son of John and Margaret Flansburg, the former of whom was born, lived and died on Helderburg farm, both attaining great ages. Michael Flansburg owned a farm just under the Helderburg, whereon he resided until his death, February 12, 1887. He was a consistent churchman, pious and charitable. His wife, Maria (Simmons) Flansburg, was born in New Scotland, September 1, 1816, died there May 9, 1851, daughter of Andrew and Sarah (Ousterhout) Simmons, born in Albany county, New York, died on their farm in New Scotland. They were well-known early settlers of that section; Mr. Simmons died in middle life, survived by his wife, who married (second) Zachariah Smith, no issue, and died at an extreme old age.

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